For second straight year, NC ranks as one of the worst states for teachers

42 Comment(s) | Posted

Worse than Mississippi: Ranking underscores that the promises and praise for teachers by North Carolina’s legislature and governor have basically added up to empty rhetoric and a record which lags almost every other U.S. state. 

In a new ranking of the nation’s best and worst states to be a public school teacher, North Carolina ranks second from the bottom among all 50 states and the District of Columbia. While North Carolina ranked 50th (second from the bottom), Virginia ranked the second best state in which to work as a teacher. South Carolina was 46th. Tennessee was 34th. Texas, which has repeatedly held teacher job fairs in NC to lure away experienced educators with substantially better pay, ranked 26th.

The rankings by WalletHub, an online personal finance information clearinghouse, are based on public education investment and teacher salary statistics from 2014-15. The rankings do not factor in salary data from the 2015-16 state budget, which gives no permanent raise to veteran North Carolina teachers and offers only a one-time $750 bonus for the state’s most experienced K-12 educators. In this same survey last year, North Carolina ranked 51st - the dead last worst state in which to be a teacher.

What are North Carolina teachers saying about NC's ranking as the second worst state in which to be a public school teacher?

“NC education is in a state of crisis. If our education ranks almost last, so will eventually our students. That’s not fair to anyone: our educators, our students, our society.” - Ashlee Garrison, Cumberland Co. 2015-16 Teacher of Year

“It’s not surprising, just disappointing to continually be in this profession in this state.” - Mary Robinson, Pitt Co. teacher

“Until North Carolina is a better place to teach than its next door neighbors, nothing will ebb the flow of teachers leaving our state for better conditions.” - Dov Rosenberg, Durham Co. public school teacher

“This is no longer just about undervaluing teachers. It is about destroying the profession.” - Stacy Eleczko, Wake Co. public school teacher

“I worry about my 2-year-old granddaughter. Every teacher I speak with is extremely frustrated and overworked. I am afraid we will lose more of our brightest teachers.” - Dianne Jones, Wake Co. public school teacher

“I’m seriously not sure if I will teach through the remainder of this school year.” - Steven Grindstaff, Yancey Co. public school teacher

“With continually being devalued unless it’s an election year, we’ll assuredly stay at the bottom of the pack.” - Mary Robinson, Pitt Co. public school teacher

Comments

  1. Tom's avatar
    Tom
    | Permalink
    Well go ahead public servants, quit your cushy teaching gigs and go work in the private sector. Good luck finding a job, as almost 50% of graduating college students can attest. If you DO find one, you will be lucky to be paid more than 30k a year...a year being 12 months, not the 10 months you currently work. And good luck having good health insurance provided; that's not likely. And a pension ? They don't exist anymore in the private sector. Prepare to pony up your own retirement $$ out of your own paycheck into a 401k. If you're lucky, your employer may kick in a few $$ to"match". Go ahead, join the rest of us who have had no increase in 7 years, and our health insurance premiums doubled to boot. Tired of your griping, as tho the average homeowner is rolling in dough and able to pay the tax increases that your salary and benefits demands will cause..
  2. Admin's avatar
    Admin
    | Permalink
    There are many state employee affected in addition to the teachers and we work 12 months a year. My health insurance is a fairly good deal premium wise but my co-pays are through the roof. All employees, teacher or not, have an automatic 6% deducted from their salary for their "retirement". No one tells you this until after you accept the job. Out of a paycheck that is way less than the going rate in the private sector, that really hurts. Things may have been the way you are describing years ago but that is no longer the case.
  3. JS's avatar
    JS
    | Permalink
    Tom - You are clueless.
  4. Christina's avatar
    Christina
    | Permalink
    I am not a public school teacher, but I find these comments by Tom to be that of a completely ignorant and ungrateful fool. If you think teaching is such a "cushy" job, perhaps you should go back to school and try doing this. Try being around children that are NOT your own and many who do NOT want to be in school Then try having to deal with ungrateful parents like you who think their kids are more important and better than everyone else. <br /> <br /> When the Sandyhook shooting happened, teachers died in order to protect their students. How many people in the private sector would do this for their colleagues? <br /> <br /> Tom, you are a real jerk.
  5. DK's avatar
    DK
    | Permalink
    Tom - you've obviously never known a teacher or spent much time around one...if you had you'd know there is NOTHING cushy about being a teacher. Is it cushy to have to report a 7 y/o to child services because they have burn marks on their legs? Is it cushy to have to teach children discipline and respect at school because the don't have parents who are involved in their lives? Is it cushy when you make a report to child services and the kid is yanked from school by their "parent" the very next day? How about working 5-5 but only getting paid for 7-3? Ask any teacher and they'll tell you there's not one freaking thing that's cushy about the job. Check yourself.
  6. RY's avatar
    RY
    | Permalink
    @Tom You do realize that being last means that any other state is a better option. In the article is describes how Texas is currently coming to our state to recruit teachers by highlighting the better pay. This means that teachers will find better jobs as teachers in other states. The best teachers will be able to name their state as many states are running into teacher shortages. Something we will be up against very soon. Also Those left in our state will not be the best but will be those who simply have no options. We will be the place where those people will end up. Because you get what you pay for.. We will accumulate the worst while losing our best. This is a recipe for failure in any organization whether or not they are public or private.
  7. Lance's avatar
    Lance
    | Permalink
    I sympathize with teachers as I am one. The problem goes deeper than state budgeting and politics, folks. If you give away "free" cell phones, have 47% of folks on public assistance, etc. something has to give. Is it wrong to cut the school budget? Sure it is. But my question is... "If not education, then what?". You cannot vote for politicians that drive up the deficit then expect everything to be peachy. What we are dealing with is a natural consequence to having a portly budget. Things will only get worse until we reign in the spending. This is not just a Republican problem... or a Democrat problem... It is a SPENDING problem.
  8. Lance's avatar
    Lance
    | Permalink
    I sympathize with teachers as I am one. The problem goes deeper than state budgeting and politics, folks. If you give away "free" cell phones, have 47% of folks on public assistance, etc. something has to give. Is it wrong to cut the school budget? Sure it is. But my question is... "If not education, then what?". You cannot vote for politicians that drive up the deficit then expect everything to be peachy. What we are dealing with is a natural consequence to having a portly budget. Things will only get worse until we reign in the spending. This is not just a Republican problem... or a Democrat problem... It is a SPENDING problem.
  9. Lance's avatar
    Lance
    | Permalink
    I sympathize with teachers as I am one. The problem goes deeper than state budgeting and politics, folks. If you give away "free" cell phones, have 47% of folks on public assistance, etc. something has to give. Is it wrong to cut the school budget? Sure it is. But my question is... "If not education, then what?". You cannot vote for politicians that drive up the deficit then expect everything to be peachy. What we are dealing with is a natural consequence to having a portly budget. Things will only get worse until we reign in the spending. This is not just a Republican problem... or a Democrat problem... It is a SPENDING problem.
  10. Ryan's avatar
    Ryan
    | Permalink
    Tom,<br /> <br /> Thank you. You have highlighted one of the other drawbacks of being a teacher. There are many like you with the same attitude who actually undermine this noble profession. It is this negativity that poisons the next generation against education. I am sure in some small way you have passed this claptrap to your children; this has a knock-on affect inasmuch as they will not value what has been given to them, given to them by caring professionals and a government that serves the right of the people to a decent education. <br /> I think you have taken a great deal for granted. I have not explanation for your bitterness for teachers but it is misplaced.<br /> Tom, learning is a life long endeavor and you have a great deal to learn regardless of your age. I suggest you start by 'googling' Malala to see what, perhaps, you have taken for granted. Set aside a little time for reflection about your place in the world.<br /> <br /> <br /> - A former VIF teacher who taught in Greensboro, NC for three years
  11. a former VIF teacher in Greensboro, NC's avatar
    a former VIF teacher in Greensboro, NC
    | Permalink
    Tom: Thank you. You have highlighted one of the other drawbacks of being a teacher. There are many like you with the same attitude who actually undermine this noble profession. It is this negativity that poisons the next generation against education. I am sure in some small way you have passed this claptrap to your children; this has a knock-on affect inasmuch as they will not value what has been given to them, given to them by caring professionals and a government that serves the right of the people to a decent education. I think you have taken a great deal for granted. I have no explanation for your bitterness for teachers but it is misplaced. Tom, learning is a life long endeavor and you have a great deal to learn regardless of your age. I suggest you start by 'googling' Malala to see what, perhaps, you have taken for granted. Set aside a little time for reflection about your place in the world.
  12. John's avatar
    John
    | Permalink
    This "article" is misleading and pandering. The criteria was based on money spent, noting else. Money spent is not remotely proportional to results.
  13. Whit's avatar
    Whit
    | Permalink
    Tom and no few others (including the author of the post, who otherwise did a fine job) are missing the main point. North Carolina's legislature is controlled by ideologues who refrain from abolishing the public education system only because they doubt that they'd get away with it. They answer to no logic, tear up at no sob stories, and are unmoved by state standings. They are cultists whose first tenet is that top-bracket taxes must come down each and every year in which there's no election campaign. And if they can throw a few crumbs to the middle brackets and pass it off as a "middle class tax cut," not even election years are off limits. Their goal is to eliminate their income tax burden, and education is a plump target. In discussing cuts, Tom asked, "If not education, then what?" What we cannot afford, Tom, is these reflexive, unreasoned cuts for the top brackets. Theology makes for bad fiscal planning. But if you really want to stop this, then stop bringing talking points to a knife fight. If you're not organizing, you're spinning your wheels.
  14. Carol's avatar
    Carol
    | Permalink
    Okay everybody is jumping on Tom...no Tom saying teaching is a cushy job was exactly fair but on the other hand all the complaints that I hear from teachers are the same complaints that most the rest of us can make to. Wages are stagnant, healthcare costs have risen sharply and job security is at an all time low. If a teacher wants to complain about her clientele he/she went into the wrong line of work and need to re-evaluate their choice of a career. Under paid and over worked is not exclusive to teachers. Nor is it the same as what workers of 30, 40, or 50 years ago would have thought. M
  15. Carol's avatar
    Carol
    | Permalink
    Okay everybody is jumping on Tom...no Tom saying teaching is a cushy job was exactly fair but on the other hand all the complaints that I hear from teachers are the same complaints that most the rest of us can make to. Wages are stagnant, healthcare costs have risen sharply and job security is at an all time low. If a teacher wants to complain about her clientele he/she went into the wrong line of work and need to re-evaluate their choice of a career. Under paid and over worked is not exclusive to teachers. Nor is it the same as what workers of 30, 40, or 50 years ago would have thought. M
  16. Alexis White's avatar
    Alexis White
    | Permalink
    I've tried to be a teacher for 3 years (not counting all of the times I tried here and there). No one will give me a chance, saying that a person has to be highly qualified, and my degree in Business Administration wasn't enough for Business Education, and that I'd only be interviewed if no already licensed person was hired. I've tried in Bertie, Hertford and Halifax Counties. The school systems pick who they want. They don't even give anyone a chance to do the job. I don't care about the money, I don't care about the raise. I just want to teach. I want to teach so bad that I went back to grad school just to get a Master's degree in Education, and it is hard doing that and subbing (apparently the only thing I'm good at) when some teachers look down at you like you only have a high school diploma or less. So I mean, on one hand I'm appalled and saddened at how this state is considered second worst, but on the other hand, I don't see where they're trying anything.
  17. MW's avatar
    MW
    | Permalink
    I love that teachers are villainized by the very public that we serve. Yes, we work at the school for 10 months but many of us have additional jobs. No one pays into my retirement for me. As a matter of fact, the state takes money for the retirement "pot" that I will never see again! My healthcare isn't cheap. Do you know any teachers Tom?
  18. ADHD mom's avatar
    ADHD mom
    | Permalink
    As a parent of an ADHD child, I can tell you that teachers deal with WAY more than any "private sector" jobs. They DESERVE higher pay than what they get. They teach because they WANT to but that doesn't change the fact that they are not treated equally as private sector employees. Our teachers deserve more pay than someone that sits in an office all day. They aren't the only ones being cheated, but they are the ones being cheated the MOST.
  19. David's avatar
    David
    | Permalink
    Carol, that is exactly the point. Teachers are choosing other professions and locals to work. What happens when 50% or more of the teachers " reevaluate" their career choice and go elsewhere? Your child or grandchild will have no teacher in the classroom. Then whom do you point your finger? Teaching like every other profession is a choice, but the problem is when educators leave the profession and create an educational vacuum, there will be no one there to fill it. Society then will point their finger at each other expecting someone else to fill the void. We need to protect our educational system, regardless of its drawbacks, it is still second to none in the world. World wide rankings in science and math mean nothing. We are the only nation that includes all (educationally disabled, English as a second language, etc.) in our test scores. We teach them all with pride. No other country does this. Yes, we could do better, but that can be said with every industry. Carol I am sure your employer can illuminate many weaknesses in your job performance also. Those in glass houses should not cast stones.
  20. David's avatar
    David
    | Permalink
    Carol, that is exactly the point. Teachers are choosing other professions and locals to work. What happens when 50% or more of the teachers " reevaluate" their career choice and go elsewhere? Your child or grandchild will have no teacher in the classroom. Then whom do you point your finger? Teaching like every other profession is a choice, but the problem is when educators leave the profession and create an educational vacuum, there will be no one there to fill it. Society then will point their finger at each other expecting someone else to fill the void. We need to protect our educational system, regardless of its drawbacks, it is still second to none in the world. World wide rankings in science and math mean nothing. We are the only nation that includes all (educationally disabled, English as a second language, etc.) in our test scores. We teach them all with pride. No other country does this. Yes, we could do better, but that can be said with every industry. Carol I am sure your employer can illuminate many weaknesses in your job performance also. Those in glass houses should not cast stones.
  21. JR's avatar
    JR
    | Permalink
    My two cents: I am a teacher. I have taught, as a lateral entry high school science teacher for the past three years in an underserved area where more than 50% of the student population receives free or reduced priced lunches. What this means, to Tom and others who are not directly involved with the educational system, is that the majority of the county is at or below the poverty line. Many students come to school poorly clothed, without functional shoes, and hungry. I spend a portion of each paycheck buying food for my students to eat since many only eat while they are at school. I buy all of the school supplies my classes need--scissors, glue, pencils, pens, paper, rulers, etc. because my students and their parents can't afford to buy even the most basic supplies, assuming they even have a way to get to the store. More than 1/2 of my student population read below grade level (3-5th grade is the norm). We have 20 microscopes in the whole school; the textbooks are falling apart and more then 10 years out of date, and the computers/internet go down regularly. I spend more than half of my day dealing with behavior issues and mental health issues. Add to this, as a lateral entry teacher, I was required to take and pass a series of "pedagogy" classes that "I" paid for out of pocket while teaching 100 students. 1/4 to 1/3 of those students were English as a Second Language students or had learning issues (504 or IEP) necessitating an individual plan to address them. That in addition to staff meetings, department meetings, parent/teacher meetings, tutoring, lesson planning, professional development, school improvement and activities on top of a 45 minute commute -- one way--my day was full. I worked from the middle of August to the middle of June, every year. A minimum of two weeks of my "summer vacation" went to mandatory continuing education classes and seminars. Another two weeks went to unpaid meetings in the county on how to improve our all important test scores. This left me with approximately three weeks of "summer vacation" which is about what someone in the private sector receives annually. 6% of my already meager paycheck is deducted for my "retirement" and I am taxed more than 20% of my income while still having to make payments on a car that is depreciating in value faster than NC Republicans can cut educational funding. I am at work at 7 am, Monday through Friday. I leave at 5 pm before going home and spending 3 hours grading or preparing for the next day. That makes for a 65 hour work week. I deal with parents who feel their child can do no wrong, students who expect to be spoon fed, a county school board who devalues homework as "It isn't fair to the students' whose parents don't do their homework for them," and a public who thinks I have a "cushy" job and should just shut up and stop whining. I am a masters degree prepared biologist and I make less money per year than a plumber with a certificate or an associates degree or a police officer with only a high school education, both of which are worthy professions and deserve what they are paid. Before I leave you, stop and think for a second, it won't kill you, I promise. Who do you think is responsible for teaching you to read and write so you can write your less than considered responses? Who is responsible for teaching the doctors/nurses/physician assistants who take care of you when you are ill? Who educated the lawyers who help defend (legally) your right to say any stupid thing that pops into your head and spews out of your mouth? Hint: it was a teacher. So next time you decide to rant about the "cushy" teaching jobs, thank your teachers for making your rant possible.
  22. Brianna's avatar
    Brianna
    | Permalink
    To Tom it is folks like you that poison this world. Have you been a teacher in North Carolina? Then who asked you! Cushy is probably he funniest thing I've ever heard in reference to teaching. I dare you to try it out for one year and watch how quickly your 10 months turns into around the clock 365. Oh yeah that's weekends dear in the classroom not to mention how late you are there every night and how early you arrive before your students. Try to have higher education and it mean nothing because people without degrees are the substitutes when you're at professional development so why is a degree needed anyway? There is so much wrong with every one of your words. I am a college graduate who DID teach in NC and left to return to the Northeast because of the conditions in NC. So now I substitute teach instead without medical, vacation or a pension accruing. The fact that i would leave it all is the point of this article. I am eager and young and educated with a lot to offer NC but the conditions wouldn't keep me or many many others. I can only hope you do not comment on all articles in this way and that you don't have children to pollute with your misguided views.
  23. Brianna's avatar
    Brianna
    | Permalink
    To Tom it is folks like you that poison this world. Have you been a teacher in North Carolina? Then who asked you! Cushy is probably he funniest thing I've ever heard in reference to teaching. I dare you to try it out for one year and watch how quickly your 10 months turns into around the clock 365. Oh yeah that's weekends dear in the classroom not to mention how late you are there every night and how early you arrive before your students. Try to have higher education and it mean nothing because people without degrees are the substitutes when you're at professional development so why is a degree needed anyway? There is so much wrong with every one of your words. I am a college graduate who DID teach in NC and left to return to the Northeast because of the conditions in NC. So now I substitute teach instead without medical, vacation or a pension accruing. The fact that i would leave it all is the point of this article. I am eager and young and educated with a lot to offer NC but the conditions wouldn't keep me or many many others. I can only hope you do not comment on all articles in this way and that you don't have children to pollute with your misguided views.
  24. Jennifer's avatar
    Jennifer
    | Permalink
    The biggest problem boils down to the amount of pointless testing &amp; assessing that not only costs millions but takes valuable time from teaching. It was calculated that about 9 out of the 36 weeks are devoted to assessing &amp; testing to determine a"level" any teacher can figure out in 5 minutes. If teachers could go back just 10 years when teaching was teaching-test scores, morale &amp; learning would improve.
  25. Larry Miesner's avatar
    Larry Miesner
    | Permalink
    Tom,<br /> I'm not a teacher, but you are a dumb ass! Just a mean know-nothing dumb ass. Larry
  26. Larry Miesner's avatar
    Larry Miesner
    | Permalink
    Tom,<br /> I'm not a teacher, but you are a dumb ass! Just a mean know-nothing dumb ass. Larry
  27. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (including many parents) cannot or will not!
  28. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (including many parents) cannot or will not!
  29. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (including many parents) cannot or will not!
  30. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (including many parents) cannot or will not!
  31. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (including many parents) cannot or will not!
  32. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (was many parents) cannot or will not!
  33. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (was many parents) cannot or will not!
  34. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (was many parents) cannot or will not!
  35. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (was many parents) cannot or will not!
  36. Marilyn Ruben's avatar
    Marilyn Ruben
    | Permalink
    Tom, I don't know you, but I DO know myself! I have a Master's Degree with about 60 hours of Education classes, 54 hours of English classes, 45 hours of Art classes, and about 30 years of teaching experience. I studied with "the cream of the crop" when I was a student in high school and college! No problems! When I moved to Arizona (second from the bottom of the list), I found Homeless Children and Parents, Learning Disabi!ities, Schools without School Supplies, Behavior Problems, Outdated or damaged Textbooks, kids who could not read, etc. I have had culture shock ever since! I returned to college to "upgrade my skills," and I don't know if it is worth it, because "Systems don't change , people do!". Teachers work very hard! I see their exhausted faces and bodies every day. But the corporate world is not for me, so that is whers I will end up....in Education! It is NOT a " cushy job" and that is a total insult! It is a job fir those who are dedi-cated to teaching the next generation that which the rest of the world (was many parents) cannot or will not!
  37. Arthur Frymyer's avatar
    Arthur Frymyer
    | Permalink
    How to put money in your friends' pockets:<br /> 1- Ensure the teachers are unhappy enough to move to other states.<br /> 2- Replace experienced veteran teachers with rookies.<br /> 3- Cackle gleefully as test scores plummet.<br /> 4- Point to the failing school system as a reason to changel<br /> 5- Privatize the school system, putting billions of taxpayer dollars in the hands of your cronies.<br /> <br /> Thanks, Governor McCrory!
  38. JB's avatar
    JB
    | Permalink
    Before everybody gets in a huff ... this survey is from a website called WalletHub that has nothing to do with education.<br /> The study doesn't even appear on their website and no methodology is offered. For all anyone knows, their criteria is that any states with North or Carolina in the name go to the end of the line.
  39. Tim Supple's avatar
    Tim Supple
    | Permalink
    Hummmm ..... I just heard a news article where NC Teachers now make a minimum of 30 or 35K, which is far more than our Troops make !!
  40. AJ's avatar
    AJ
    | Permalink
    You want to know what will happen when there are no teachers left??? Business men will fill their pockets with what was previously public school money and open Charter Schools. They will hire "teachers" without degrees in their areas of teaching much less certification to teach. They will have to teach everyone, not just the rich, white kids they teach now (or whose rich parents augment their education at home). They will do all of this without 504 Plans for learning disabled or enrichment programs for the academically gifted. Does your child have a learning disability? Too bad, your problem! Is your child not challenged enough at school? Too bad, your problem.,<br /> While these business men are getting rich off our tax dollars that should be spent on providing your child's transportation to and from school, athletic teams, Arts classes and nutritious meals (that's right, get ready to take your kids to and from school every day, send their lunch and figure out how to fill in the gaps of time provided by the extra curricular activities that exist now) your child will struggle academically, physically, mentally and emotionally. <br /> Think this won't happen? Then it's time to open your eyes because it has already started!
  41. Dr. Jerry's avatar
    Dr. Jerry
    | Permalink
    I teach in AZ, #49. What percentage of NC population is retirees? We in AZ have found that the retirees moving to AZ are reluctant to vote for education or any tax increase.
  42. Robin Rowden's avatar
    Robin Rowden
    | Permalink
    I was a guidance counselor in Cumberland County Schools for 6 years in the 90's. I can't believe North Carolina hasn't improved in all this time. The state seemed to be really working hard then to improve test scores with monetary incentives and to improve working conditions for teachers.<br /> <br /> I have to say, I did have some terrible experiences with a principal. He was very intimidating, cruel and a bully. Because there was no union, I was forced to just live with this until I was able to transfer out of that school.<br /> The wages were very low. Once divorced, I could not support my two children on my salary alone. When I left North Carolina and found a job in another state as a guidance counselor, my salary increased by $14,000 per year.
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