1,000 teachers resign from Charlotte area schools

78 Comment(s) | Posted |

North Carolina's teacher pay, ranked 42nd in the nation, has made it difficult to recruit and retain public school teachers, and it just got harder for one school system. Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, the second largest school district in the state, has had 957 teacher resign for the upcoming year. Local educators say that loss is unprecedented, and will impact students when they return to class in the fall.

From WBTV 

"900 teachers resigning," Lyde said. "In one system is unheard of in my 33 years of education. This is a crisis point and people need to wake up."

"That's a lot," Waddell said. "We can't afford to lose teachers to other states so we got to make sure we are taking care of our own."

"Students won't have teachers on their first day," Lyde said. "They may not have teachers on the 60th day."

 

Comments

  1. Laura sciara's avatar
    Laura sciara
    | Permalink
    I am a former teacher at a Charlotte mecklenburg school and I would not go back. It's not the pay. It's definitely not the kids at the school I taught at which had a 95% homeless population...I love them. It was the lack of support from administration and higher ups.
  2. Adam's avatar
    Adam
    | Permalink
    I'm sure it was unintentional that you forget this paragraph:<br /> <br /> "CMS says that number doesn't stand out and is no different than any other years. Others disagree."
  3. Renee's avatar
    Renee
    | Permalink
    I worked for CMS too. The pay was terrible. I worked three jobs in order to pay bills. And that was just for one person. Lack of support, the foolishness with administration, and the politics were enough for me to leave.
  4. Mike's avatar
    Mike
    | Permalink
    OMG, seriously? "CMS says that number doesn't stand out and is no different than any other years"<br /> <br /> If CMS had maybe, say, 15,000 teachers, no, 25,000, then maybe 957 resigning in one year wouldn't "stand out", but without even looking it up I"m betting 957 is a huge percentage of the actual total number of teachers in the district.<br /> <br /> Nice going, NC Legislators - nice going.
  5. Linda Thomas's avatar
    Linda Thomas
    | Permalink
    Wow! This is a significant loss....
  6. Linda Thomas's avatar
    Linda Thomas
    | Permalink
    Wow! This is a significant loss....
  7. Robert Kemp's avatar
    Robert Kemp
    | Permalink
    Total number of teachers and support staff 10,798. <br /> http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/mediaroom/aboutus/Pages/FastFacts.aspx
  8. Carolyn Johnson's avatar
    Carolyn Johnson
    | Permalink
    I taught very successfully in one of the low socioeconomic school for 17 years. I retired 2 months before the school year ended due to a very abusive principal. Many teachers left during those 2 years. These were very dedicated people. With the principal that followed, many more teachers left, even more would have left but she blocked their leaving. I know of 2 that retired rather than working under this principal. It was also noted that she monitored the teachers facebook pages. I now know only 5 teachers at my old school. The school has another new principal and from what the teachers have seen they are hopeful.
  9. Carolyn Johnson's avatar
    Carolyn Johnson
    | Permalink
    I taught very successfully in one of the low socioeconomic school for 17 years. I retired 2 months before the school year ended due to a very abusive principal. Many teachers left during those 2 years. These were very dedicated people. With the principal that followed, many more teachers left, even more would have left but she blocked their leaving. I know of 2 that retired rather than working under this principal. It was also noted that she monitored the teachers facebook pages. I now know only 5 teachers at my old school. The school has another new principal and from what the teachers have seen they are hopeful.
  10. Carolyn Johnson's avatar
    Carolyn Johnson
    | Permalink
    I taught very successfully in one of the low socioeconomic school for 17 years. I retired 2 months before the school year ended due to a very abusive principal. Many teachers left during those 2 years. These were very dedicated people. With the principal that followed, many more teachers left, even more would have left but she blocked their leaving. I know of 2 that retired rather than working under this principal. It was also noted that she monitored the teachers facebook pages. I now know only 5 teachers at my old school. The school has another new principal and from what the teachers have seen they are hopeful.
  11. Carolyn Johnson's avatar
    Carolyn Johnson
    | Permalink
    I taught very successfully in one of the low socioeconomic school for 17 years. I retired 2 months before the school year ended due to a very abusive principal. Many teachers left during those 2 years. These were very dedicated people. With the principal that followed, many more teachers left, even more would have left but she blocked their leaving. I know of 2 that retired rather than working under this principal. It was also noted that she monitored the teachers facebook pages. I now know only 5 teachers at my old school. The school has another new principal and from what the teachers have seen they are hopeful.
  12. Carolyn Johnson's avatar
    Carolyn Johnson
    | Permalink
    I taught very successfully in one of the low socioeconomic school for 17 years. I retired 2 months before the school year ended due to a very abusive principal. Many teachers left during those 2 years. These were very dedicated people. With the principal that followed, many more teachers left, even more would have left but she blocked their leaving. I know of 2 that retired rather than working under this principal. It was also noted that she monitored the teachers facebook pages. I now know only 5 teachers at my old school. The school has another new principal and from what the teachers have seen they are hopeful.
  13. Carolyn Johnson's avatar
    Carolyn Johnson
    | Permalink
    I did not mean to post my comment more than once - the submit button did not indicate that it was posted.
  14. RANDY EVERHART's avatar
    RANDY EVERHART
    | Permalink
    what are we going to do about this mess???? ,,, vote more republicans, I guess ????? we need more like we need herpes !!!!!!!!
  15. Celia's avatar
    Celia
    | Permalink
    And now they are advertising on Craigslist in NY and other states because NC does not produce enough teachers through our teacher education programs.
  16. Melissa's avatar
    Melissa
    | Permalink
    I taught at CMS for 4years the pay is horrible. My school had a high Hispanic population with little support for them to learn our principal was ok.
  17. Anne M.'s avatar
    Anne M.
    | Permalink
    I left CMS many years ago for greener pastures in California.<br /> I am so glad I did. The cost of living is higher here, that is true, but teachers are treated much better here and my salary and pension are very good compared to what I was making in NC. I also had a principal at CMS very early in my career and he damaged my self esteem as a teacher before I even got started. No union to back me up, no support system from the Administration. I understand why teachers are leaving. it's time they treat teachers in NC as professionals and pay them as professionals and treat them as professionals. My bet is that the Republican legislature doesn't care about the public schools anyway and would love to see them fail so that they can privatize education.
  18. Matt's avatar
    Matt
    | Permalink
    Imagine, just imagine educators. What if ALL of you stuck together. Nationwide! Your voice could not be ignored. You COULD demand support, and get it. You COULD demand fair pay, and get it. What if your motto was truly: An attack on one district is an attack on us all? Imagine your power.
  19. Dana's avatar
    Dana
    | Permalink
    It's out of 9,180 teachers. So, roughly 10% have quit?? Found at http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/mediaroom/aboutus/Pages/FastFacts.aspx<br /> <br /> I'd like to find information where that is a normal rate of attrition either for CMS. all schools in general, NC schools, or school systems of equivalent size.
  20. alley's avatar
    alley
    | Permalink
    You treat teachers poorly, teachers leave. NC is a known teacher-unfriendly state, so who really didn't see this coming? Teachers are fed up. The NC legislature is not really listening. This will probably escalate until the problems are fixed.
  21. Venisha's avatar
    Venisha
    | Permalink
    I totally understand why educators are leaving the profession. It's not the children, it's the pay and administration. It is difficult to do your job without support from your administration in addition to the poor wages. I don't see it improving anytime soon.
  22. Mary Williams's avatar
    Mary Williams
    | Permalink
    If you people think this mess is "new" you are fooling yourself. Everyone seems to forget that republicans have been in power for3 years after 100 years of democratic rule. The beginning of the end of good education started with the break down of the nuclear family and taking discipline out of schools. If you think teachers teach for the money, you have a lot to learn. If students and parents were held accountable for behavior and learning assignments, there would be more teachers than jobs. Teacher assistants are pulled from classrooms to cover in school suspensions so we don't inconvenience parents and school's stats don't look bad. If parents had to stay home or pay for their child to be taken care of until they could not interrupt other student's right to an education, things would change. I witnessed a child sitting on a childcare bus after school behaving himself. During the school day he is a behavior problem everywhere he goes. What is the difference? He can get "kicked out" of after school care and I would bet my salary his parents have told him he will have consequences if he does. #soapbox
  23. Sue's avatar
    Sue
    | Permalink
    The same things are happening to teachers in Indiana. In fact Carolyn ' s story could have been about my old school. The Republicans here have destroyed public education and that's what their whole agenda has been about.
  24. Kelly's avatar
    Kelly
    | Permalink
    I am also a former CMS teacher. I second that it is not the pay that deters us but the abusive and lazy administrations. My last principal, Pamela Espinosa, ruined many teachers careers because she was allowed to and was never held accountable. She was abusive and demeaning. Yet no one listened to the staff. You week continue to lose teachers until you start offering them the support they deserve.
  25. Steve Pirri's avatar
    Steve Pirri
    | Permalink
    After reading this I had to post. Horrible experience and administration. Years later I heard admin scattered like rats to other districts and states while I was forced to resign, my school laptop taken so failing student grades to be changed to make better.
  26. Paul's avatar
    Paul
    | Permalink
    Of 18,000 total employees a little more than 9000 are teachers. Does that tell you something? Test scores are fudged, the state puts a HUGE curve on required tests so that a student who scores a 20 still gets a grade equal to a B. Students run the schools cursing teachers and acting up but policy wont allow suspensions so the state doesnt get nervous. You have the philosophy that if someone does not teach well, they are placed in a vacant admin position or positions are created. CMS keeps asking for millions more each year but yet teachers buy many of their own basic supplies and cannot get books while some classes have over 80 students - yes. 80 students - in some classes. The system is overrun with people that are not teachers but have titles behind their names. Some schools have vacancies for the entire past school year. CMS is a bad system that has plenty of blame to go around from the legislature to local politicians to administrators and yes, some teachers. And dont believe the graduation stat that they boast cause it is fake too. Principals change grades or bully teachers to allow graduating to get rid of kids who never come to school and so individual schools dont look bad. I dont blame any teacher for going somewhere else. All NC and CMS wants are fraudulent numbers to brag about.
  27. Woodie J Ischer's avatar
    Woodie J Ischer
    | Permalink
    When I moved to NC from Fairfax, Va, I held the title of Outstanding Teacher. <br /> People asked me why I didn't teach here or woke in Administration. I dodged the question as NC was boasting that it was one of the top ten system in the country. - I knew this was not true.<br /> 1. I was earning $70.000 there and was appalled at the scale here.<br /> 2. I met a number of teachers and was appalled at the working conditions and the lack of Help from the administrators and learned that they did not even have a system of mentors ( teachers trained in evaluation, curriculum development, staff development , methodology , etc.)<br /> 3. No, nothing appealed to me.
  28. Beaves's avatar
    Beaves
    | Permalink
    CMS is a joke! Worked there as a teacher and administrator for 8 years and I am extremely lucky to have had the opportunity to leave. Just to put it in perspective, I left an 11 month Assistant Principal position in CMS for a 10 month teaching position In Maryland. My salary increased $20,000. My wife, also a teacher in CMS, made a lateral move from 2nd grade teacher to 3rd grade teacher and her salary increased. $23,000. We moved to Maryland where our cost of living is slightly more. My annual house payment is about $8,000 per year more. However my taxes have not changed, my medical benefits are half the cost, I pay no personal property taxes on my cars and my utility bills are significantly less. All in all we easily net $35,000 more living in Maryland. Don't believe the BS related to cost of living. My house is 1000 square feet larger and still our property taxes and mortgage are not horribly different. I am not ashamed to bring up money as a major reason for leaving. Everyone loves to say I don't do this for the money. Well I do! My wife and I are both educators and we support our two beautiful daughters with these funds. So I make no apologies for leaving in pursuit of more money. However, the other things former CMS employees are saying are absolutely true. Discipline is a joke while teacher accountability seems to be the main agenda of CMS. CMS wants you to believe that there cannot be accomplished or distinguished teachers in failing school. They also known it's political suicide to admit that socioeconomic status is the main determining predictor in student achievement results. It's all smoke and mirrors I assure you. My wife and I loved our students in CMS but we were not treated fairly compensated fairly for the job that we performed. It is a very sad state of affairs as we truly loved living in Charlotte and we have some very dear friends who we miss due to our forced departure. I use the word force because we really had no choice. We could not stay under these ridiculous conditions.
  29. Ken Kyzer's avatar
    Ken Kyzer
    | Permalink
    I retired at mid-year but it wasn't just pay. I got out because of abusive leadership and no support. Turned to both the region and downtown without luck.
  30. Ken Kyzer's avatar
    Ken Kyzer
    | Permalink
    I retired at mid-year but it wasn't just pay. I got out because of abusive leadership and no support. Turned to both the region and downtown without luck.
  31. Dustin's avatar
    Dustin
    | Permalink
    These comments horrify me. My fiance and I just bought a house I'm stonehaven. Looks like I will be chalking up private school tuition for our future offspring
  32. john kohlwey's avatar
    john kohlwey
    | Permalink
    While the economics are a serious issue, the more pressing issue is the administrative leadership. I have seen and heard that several schools lack the basic fundamentals when it comes to managing a school and leading a school to excellence, the faculty and the students. Teachers and students must be able to trust and have confidence in their leadership to always do the right thing and what is in the best interest of the school. What we have in present day is almost a complete departure of those attributes along with other critical attributes that lend to enablement, empowerment and a higher level of education. I am thankful i no longer have a child that is exposed to this education system.
  33. Judy's avatar
    Judy
    | Permalink
    After many years of working to improve the CMS process, defend teachers who were being ganged up on by dishonest, unethical and questionable administrators, I retired so that I could work from outside the system and avoid retribution. My last school's administrator was constantly lying not only to me but to all faculty. She is so unethical and executive administration did nothing but reward her for her terrorizing tactics and lies. Just ask many who have left including Joe Evans who was mistreated by her and the Athletic Director. It is amazing to me that these inept people are not only allowed to continue to ruin the educator's careers but to ruin the educational experience and lives of students. There are many other teachers who suffered as a result of being punished by this administrator for "getting medical treatment...even for cancer". Since when is getting treated for cancer considered to be an irresponsible act? It is not okay to change grades, fake pass rates and therefore improve graduation rates. It is not okay to fabricate "advanced classes" in order to improve GPA for a few and call it education. The Dream Team is just that but it is not a real class. Parents should revolt. Fabricating transcripts is a felony but no one will take that on, Why? There are too many administrators, directors, and folks in CMS offices that never enter or have contact with students or teachers for that matter. Reduce the amount of high paid Broad or otherwise people and put the supplies and pay where it belongs...to teachers! Take a stand, support teachers so our students can receive an education that will benefit them in the future not simply be a data point on some uncaring administrator's radar. My grandchildren's future is worth more to me. How about you?? Support teachers and do not waste money on administrative data collection.
  34. Ed Williams's avatar
    Ed Williams
    | Permalink
    If you're interested in facts about Charlotte Mecklenburg teacher turnover, here's a good story from October 2014: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/education/article9226250.html
  35. Q's avatar
    Q
    | Permalink
    I'm a product of CMS and I'm appalled at what it's become. Thankfully, my oldest just graduated and my youngest only has two more years. Their high-profile, high-achieving school is nothing but smoke and mirrors. My recent-grad son's math class had approximately 75 students, and the teacher graded on a huge curve -- for which I don't blame him. The principal is in love with this school's good press and wants good numbers while turning a blind eye to the huge on-campus drug problem. (A friend of my daughter's turned around to ask a classmate a question and found him snorting cocaine off his textbook while the teacher's back was turned. This class was egregiously overcrowded, too. The girl didn't report her classmate because she was afraid. Yes, preventing drug use is the parents' job first and foremost. However, when they're on campus, they're on the school's watch.) I know for sure one teacher resigned, but imagine that number's low. I feel like I'm wishing my youngest's life away, but 2017 can't get here fast enough for this family.
  36. adam's avatar
    adam
    | Permalink
    Um, sounds just like Richmond Co. Schools at this current time they are 21 teachers short from resigning or early retirement, Seven from one school can't be the administration ,(lol) must be the teachers. They are recruiting young teachers right out of college from up North who stay 3 to 4 years and leave because of the treatment that they get from administration. Losing teachers with 20plus years service because they are fed up with being treated like crap from Administration and good ole Richmond County politics.
  37. adam's avatar
    adam
    | Permalink
    Um, sounds just like Richmond Co. Schools at this current time they are 21 teachers short from resigning or early retirement, Seven from one school can't be the administration ,(lol) must be the teachers. They are recruiting young teachers right out of college from up North who stay 3 to 4 years and leave because of the treatment that they get from administration. Losing teachers with 20plus years service because they are fed up with being treated like crap from Administration and good ole Richmond County politics.
  38. Beth's avatar
    Beth
    | Permalink
    I teach in Michigan. This school district sounds like mine ! Our superintendent is a bully. I've never know so many teachers to take medicals or retire. I hate that this is also happening in NC but I feel a little better that we're not alone.
  39. EC's avatar
    EC
    | Permalink
    I'm one of the 957 teachers that resigned. I also taught at a school in a low-income community. It wasn't the kids that made me resign. It wasn't the pay either. Administration in the sole reason why I left. Too much politics, too much favoritism, too much bullying from admin, and the lack of support from them was what forced me to make that choice unfortunately.
  40. eliza meyer's avatar
    eliza meyer
    | Permalink
    Don't come to Michigan its about the same!! no money no respect, and too much evaluation.
  41. Samantha's avatar
    Samantha
    | Permalink
    http://wunc.org/post/alarming-number-teachers-resigning-wake-county<br /> <br /> Wake County says 40% more teachers are leaving.<br /> <br /> Wake up NC
  42. Sharon's avatar
    Sharon
    | Permalink
    There was a comment in this thread mentioning that NC does not produce enough teachers within the state to fill those empty positions. This is not unique to NC, the current path of politicians to vilify teachers and schools as well as choosing to not fund our public schools is a nation wide problem. Here in NYS large numbers of veteran teachers are expected to retire in the next few years and the number of young students enrolling in education majors in our colleges is dropping quickly. I know of a least one school here which had no applicants for an open position. Politicians have successfully launched a campaign to turn our citizens against public education. In NYS there are times when a no vote legally counts more than a yes vote. I am glad my children are finished with their public education.
  43. A teacher's avatar
    A teacher
    | Permalink
    Your grammar and punctuation is horrid. How did you pass journalism school?
  44. Janna's avatar
    Janna
    | Permalink
    I have tried not to talk about this but I researched the numbers and they are not hard to find. 1300 teachers left Charlotte/Mecklenberg in 2012-13 and 2013-14 for a variety of reasons. So 1000 teacher resigning is less than the two previous years. We have a lot of problems in NC and teachers are leaving to other states, retiring and a lot fewer are in teacher education programs so a shortage is inevitable. But this one article and the original one were poorly researched and should not be our battle cry. Here is the research for those who bother to look it up. Please let's use the real numbers to make our case! http://www.ncpublicschools.org/educatoreffectiveness/surveys/leaving/
  45. Me's avatar
    Me
    | Permalink
    Time for teachers to actually teach and be held accountable. They are paid very well for what is essentially a part time job. Quit your crying and just teach.
  46. Me's avatar
    Me
    | Permalink
    Time for teachers to actually teach and be held accountable. They are paid very well for what is essentially a part time job. Quit your crying and just teach.
  47. Ann Inquirer's avatar
    Ann Inquirer
    | Permalink
    Granted teaching under abuse from toxic admins &amp; students as well as low pay is reason to leave, but what I find curiously missing is anyone complaining about the Toxic Content that now must be taught to innocent and hapless students (I know, the trouble makers don't care). The lack of ethics in the curricula is what would make me leave, and I have taught. <br /> <br /> The Left-Islamic Axis is pulling the strings of Common Core. They write and publish the textbooks &amp; assignments (ie moslem owned Pearson). I would think ethics would come into play in being forced to teach Islamic indoctrination, (it's not history if you understand what is in the Koran); convoluted math in order to frustrate; demeaning, phony &amp; race-baiting White Privilege; perversion of sex with pedophilia and oral &amp; anal sex; or revisionist history - just to hit the poisonous highlights. Or do teachers not have the time or desire to research the misinformation and outright lies in the assignments and books with which they mold the brains of their students?<br /> <br /> Call it multiculturalism or global citizenship, we know Obama, Duncan &amp; Co. have an Islamic-Marxist agenda with textbooks proving the point, and they did well with their Race to the Top carrot in getting states to accept Common Core and alphabet-named faux standards sight unseen (via both democrat &amp; RHINO legislatures). By creating and allowing chaos in the schools (as they have with Ferguson, Baltimore, millions of illegals and now unvetted Islamic immigrants), and forcing teachers to leave, the Axis will now be in the position they have originally intended - privatized school take-over for profit and investment with no available public scrutiny of what is taught - and the #LeftIslamicAxis agenda will be easily furthered. <br /> <br /> My suspicion is that these virulent admins are going to the Common Core conferences in Dubai for promises of retention in the future privatized schools. As teachers have been subjected to their admins' sharia like discipline and taqiyya (in Islam lying is permitted if it furthers an objective, thus falsifying school documents).<br /> <br /> This is a US agenda (via KDSL for one) for the "global citizens" many teachers have been unwittingly praising. As pointed out in other comments, this is all Smoke &amp; Mirrors and not just another aspect, it is the main aspect. Islam will bring discipline into the classroom with lashing which is sharia approved, and the Left will have communism. It's back to the future, Orwell 1984. Though at present Islam is only using the Left, it intends to dominate as mandated in the Koran.<br /> <br /> Sound far fetched? Did it sound far fetched that Bin Laden would take down two 100 story towers? Or far fetched only 8 years ago that school systems would disintegrate all across the country? Put the pieces together, you educated folks. There is a reason teachers are being forced out &amp; tossed out, in the big picture it all comes down to power for a new Islamic world order and money.
  48. kate's avatar
    kate
    | Permalink
    Just wait until they start bringing Teach for America people to cover the vacancies. These people have a five week induction period, no teaching certificate, and the typical tenure is 3-5 years. Rather than pay highly qualified teachers a competitive salary, and treat them with respect, school systems are looking to hire non-qualified individuals who only take the jobs after retirement from other careers or those who cannot make it in other careers. And yes, this is the Republican way!
  49. Kenny's avatar
    Kenny
    | Permalink
    God Bless these brave educators of NC. When making a life changing decision, we first vote with our heart and our head. When that does not help, we vote with our feet! I have taught in three states. My experiences are mirrored by the above comments. I have worked with amazing teachers who perform miracles every day with hungry, angry, abused, neglected, spoiled, broken students and families while administration throws roadblocks, threats and passive aggressive actions. "Good girls don't get corner offices" definitely applies to school administrators. Most are insecure, immature. Imagine junior high/middle school social behaviors and you have the type of culture that is in power in public schools. Teachers are held accountable 24/7 and micromanaged into insanity. School administrators have free reign and unlimited "get out of jail free" cards.
  50. Michelle's avatar
    Michelle
    | Permalink
    They way public school teachers are treated is ridiculous. Please look up Badass Teachers Assoc on FB and Twitter and be active!!
  51. Jenny Smith's avatar
    Jenny Smith
    | Permalink
    I have a similar experience to Carol. I worked successfully in Title I schools in CMS and enjoyed the students. The past 2 years I have worked under an abusive principal and completely incompetent administrative staff. Complaints to HR, CTA, poor Insight surveys, only 70% of our students tested, admin graduated students who did not have enough credits to graduate, and the list continues. All of them still have a job and there were NO repercussions. There are now over 55 vacancies. I am one of the people who left to go to another district for less pay. This 1,000 number is in part due to the low pay state wide but, I would like to know how many people left due to the horrific administration that is in place throughout the district and have left to do the same job in other districts for less pay. It breaks my heart for the students in the district who are victim to the abusive principals.
  52. me's avatar
    me
    | Permalink
    I would love to see some of these loser teachers on this thread make it in a real professional job. That would be hilarious. If you want to be treated like professionals, then act like professionals. You are clock punches who have a million excuses why you don't do your jobs. You're failures at life, so the administration treats you as such.
  53. Pamela's avatar
    Pamela
    | Permalink
    http://www.badassteacher.org/<br /> <br /> Is a national group against testing, common core and vouchers. They are supportive of unions, and public schools. They will be marching on Washington DC July 23 to 26. Join to help support public schools and students. They are loud, strong and making a difference.
  54. Carol Towne's avatar
    Carol Towne
    | Permalink
    Im a retired CMS teacher of 25 years. I retired prior to the loss of Longetivity and no raises after 25 years of service. I received my lump sum Longevity payment, which was a substantial amount. Now, teachers at 25 years and beyond will receive no raise. I retired due to the moral climate within our school and the school system. I have not one day regretted. retiring at the age of 53 with 25 years. I spent half of my life in a chosen professional career due to the rewards in educating our youth. It's no longer a desired career for many reasons and<br /> understandably so. Teachers in CMS are no longer appreciated and the school climate is suffering. Teachers are not treated as professionals. No one in the professional world outside of teaching, could even begin to tackle the job as Teacher. Your 9-5 job with and in the adult world have no clue as to the demands of this career. We didn't choose it for the "corporate ladder". We chose it because we wanted to make a difference. However, when the lack of respect reaches where we are now, and the lack of appreciation is conveyed on a daily basis, regardless of pay increases, it's time to move on and rise above the idiocies spoken. <br /> CMS will miss 1,000 positions. CMS has made a name for themselves. <br /> NC is 42nd now. Wait 5 more years.
  55. Jules's avatar
    Jules
    | Permalink
    To respond to the comments from ME - the fact that you can even read and write is credited to a teacher. So, before you are so disrespectful you need to think about that one. <br /> Also, teaching is a very low paying job which gets very little respect in the US. It is not a part time job because teachers generally work on lesson plans, materials, etc. over the weekend and summer. Its sad that the general population is so ill informed and that we don't give those teaching our kids the respect that they are due. <br /> Also, I agree with the money in education being misspent. Too much funding goes to administration, testing, and special programs that do not benefit the students while at the same time the costs of necessity items are shifted to the teachers and parents. <br /> Education needs to be overhauled and the public officials that are getting paid from tax dollars need accountability for their actions. Many people put down homeschooling but these problems are a prime example of why many are choosing that route.
  56. Susan Sante's avatar
    Susan Sante
    | Permalink
    I'm a substitute teacher in Tucson. Many of the remarks made could have been about the situation in Az as well. It does seem as though that states mainly governed by Republicans are undermining public ed in as many ways as possible. What I find hard to understand is the public's lasses faire attitude towards this. Think about it. Besides family and close family friends, what adult(s) had any kind of influence on you during your growing up years? If you had a fairly standard upbringing, these people may have been just a pleasant addition to a normal life. But to some children, a teacher's recognition, encouragement and/or substantive assistance has made a world of difference in the trajectory of their lives. No one else has such a potentially significant job.
  57. Gail's avatar
    Gail
    | Permalink
    They advertise in NY and other northern states because they want to wean out southern values. I think they make life difficult for local teachers so that they can hire from northern states for this purpose. They are accomplishing their goals; it's just that their goals don't mesh with our logic. If they were not accomplishing their goals, they would be changing their tactics.
  58. Oh My!'s avatar
    Oh My!
    | Permalink
    me; It is very ignorant to clump nearly 10,000 people into one category, as you have, accurately. Of course there are a few dead-beat teachers as there are dead-beat people in every profession.. You will never convince me that all teachers are incompetent.
  59. Nikki's avatar
    Nikki
    | Permalink
    I love how they blame the low pay for teachers leaving. Teachers don't go into the profession to be rich. It would be nice to be paid better. However, the real problem in CMS is the politics, constant turnover and changing in administration, lack of communication, and NO support for anything, especially behavior support.
  60. Science Teacher's avatar
    Science Teacher
    | Permalink
    CMS is a very racist system. If you don't kiss ass then you can't get far. They pay you once a month like a slave. Furthermore, they give you no supplies to teach. I worked with this prick rhymes with B. Ms Teresa Cochrane who who did not care about those children. I'm so glad that I'm free from slavery! Yes I said that! I would rather be a pimps bottom bitch before I ever work for that school system again! Mutherfuckers work you like a dog just to keep you poor. A shout out to UNCC and this sorry bitch Amy White and her racist ass. They weed great teachers out as well. Sorry for the foul language but the teaching system and teacher training needs to be exposed!
  61. an educator in CMS's avatar
    an educator in CMS
    | Permalink
    I was recently moved from a wonderful school that has seen much better days. A change in administrationhas forced many good and long tenured staff to leave or retire. The admins bully tactics forced silence among those who remained for fear of retribution. I was forced to transfer because I spoke up. The pay is horrible across all school based staff not just teachers. But the pay is not the bigger issue. The admin in the schools is the bigger issue. Bullys in the admin, racism in the admin, and no support for the staff above the school.
  62. Science Teacher's avatar
    Science Teacher
    | Permalink
    Quoting this clown of a loser that still lives in his mother's basement. Get a life asshole.<br /> <br /> June 27, 2015 at 2:32pm | Permalink<br /> I would love to see some of these loser teachers on this thread make it in a real professional job. That would be hilarious. If you want to be treated like professionals, then act like professionals. You are clock punches who have a million excuses why you don't do your jobs. You're failures at life, so the administration treats you as such.
  63. Maria's avatar
    Maria
    | Permalink
    I think the way most public school teachers in the U.S. are treated is comparable to Nazi Germany with Arne Duncan comparable to Adolph Hitler! In Germany when it all "first started" it was acceptable to make fun of the Jews (now like teachers). They were even allowed to print hateful cartoons, etc. making fun of Jews in their newspapers, etc. Then as it all escalated &amp; got continually worse, hardly anyone had the balls to speak up on what was wrong (like now in public education). Hitler (like Arne Duncan) worked to destroy the unions. He and his cronies fooled the public and made Jew basing (now like teacher bashing) acceptable. "His SS" are much like many (not all) of the school administrators of today: evil, dishonest and just out for themselves: constantly doing things they know are morally wrong so they can get power, better pay and better security. The teachers today are much like the POW's in the Nazi war camps: working like dogs and afraid to speak up in fear of being fired (like the POW's feared death). It's all pretty scary, if you think about it!!!
  64. sue's avatar
    sue
    | Permalink
    I wish there treatment was just in that district. I am not a classroom teacher but I am a classified administrator in both an elementary and a middle school. Each year more is asked, less money is given and criticism is heaped on. <br /> Our teachers have to be data analysts, psychologists, social workers, and politicians before they can even begin to teach. Too much time is being spent trying to reach some beurecrat's idea of academic progress through assessment after assessment after assessment. Parents are coddled and not made partners in the process. They and their children have no consequences. After all we don't want to hold a child back that did nothing.... It would make the school look bad!<br /> Hang in there teachers. We desperately needed you. You make a difference and some of us do appreciate the sweat and tears!
  65. Retired CMS Administrator's avatar
    Retired CMS Administrator
    | Permalink
    I agree to much that has been said. I would like to point out that there are a small number of school-level administrators who nurture their staffs and promote a positive environment in their schools. These administrators are so ostracized and intimidated that their influence is limited and many of them leave because of the CMS culture. If an honest, positive environment were supported by. the higher level administration, I think the chances of having a good school system would increase.
  66. Chris Tucker's avatar
    Chris Tucker
    | Permalink
    Sorry, but New Mexico isn't better. I'm one of five leaving from our 8-person dept. for all of those same reasons. We're 49th worst-paid, and we don't even have printers, paper nor other supplies unless we buy it. Principal talks the talk, but has too many politicians to please until actual learning &amp; teaching fall to the lowest priority. Kids are losing out and have little faith that school is here to help them. Instead, to them, it's JUST like doing time. My heart hurts for the kids.
  67. Chris Tucker's avatar
    Chris Tucker
    | Permalink
    Sorry, but New Mexico isn't better. I'm one of five leaving from our 8-person dept. for all of those same reasons. We're 49th worst-paid, and we don't even have printers, paper nor other supplies unless we buy it. Principal talks the talk, but has too many politicians to please until actual learning &amp; teaching fall to the lowest priority. Kids are losing out and have little faith that school is here to help them. Instead, to them, it's JUST like doing time. My heart hurts for the kids.
  68. Janine's avatar
    Janine
    | Permalink
    I have been teaching high school science for 12 years in North Carolina. I have changed schools 4 times and currently work at a wonderful school with an excellent administrative team and pretty good students. I love teaching science and I love working with kids. I don't want to leave my profession. <br /> <br /> My problem is not with my school or administators, it is with North Carolina's policies on teacher pay, benefits, and the lack of respect for the teaching profession by the state government. <br /> <br /> I earned my masters before I even began teaching and only after this recent raise did I reach the 40k and above mark. I was just about to reach the 40K mark, when they froze our salaries. Living on my own, I have always just been in a survival mode, finacially. We used to get a bonus for good test scores, then they took that away. We used to get longevity pay, then they took that away. Remember when they even took a percentage of our pay one year? They just took it - no questions - and we were powerless. <br /> <br /> Now they aren't going to pay for new teachers to get retirement benefits? Are new teachers even going to get paid for their masters, or not? I can't keep up sometimes. And how about how they didn't give the veteran teachers a raise and capped them out? They also tried to take away our career status, so we would be at the mercy of administrators each year. All of this just shows me that our state government does not respect teachers, the job we do each day, nor the contributions we make to the state. <br /> <br /> Our veterans teachers are one of the best assets our schools have to offer. I have had so many mentors that were not assigned but that I talked with and learned from. Teaching is an ongoing lesson everyday and no amount of schooling can prepare you for how to handle all the different situations that arise in a classroom. Having a more experienced teacher to talk things over with really helps out a lot. NC policy makers need to stop acting like veteran teachers aren't worth their consideration. <br /> <br /> We also need good, new teachers. The highest turn over rate is always with new teachers, especially lateral entry. Not everyone can make it as a teacher. It is a tough profession. A lot of those NC policy makers couldn't make it, I would bet on that. They would be losing their tempers the first day, when they had to deal with little Johnny's attitude. But, new teachers bring excitment into the classroom and the kids can relate to them easily. They are excellent as club advisors and student mentors. You also can't have veteran teachers, if you don't have new teachers, at some point. NC policy makers need to make sure they are offering them nationally competitive salaries AND benefits. <br /> <br /> Northern states pay teachers more and provide excellent benefits, but it is hard for new teachers to get a starting position there, so many begin in other states. We should be recruiting those teachers. At the same time, we should not be ignoring the ones that want to begin teaching in our own state. Keep the teaching fellowship program strong but change it to a five year program, with a masters degree, but require a full year teaching internship. If a beginning teacher spends a full year with a licensed teacher in the class with them, they will be more fully prepared to teach on their own and will be less likely to leave the profession. <br /> <br /> NC policy makers also need to stop treating teachers like we are the problem. I do not know of any teacher, anymore, that does not teach the state curriculum; that does not try their best each year to get through to their students; that is not open to trying new methods; and does not care about what their students learn. <br /> <br /> Society has changed a lot in the past few years. Many students do not have two parents at home. A lot of students do not have someone at home that pushes for them to challenge themselves, academically. I can't even tell you how many times I have tried to reach a parent and could not get them to answer their phone, because they screen and ignore calls from the school. I don't just mean when I need to call about a behavior issue, I mean when I am calling over concern about a student's progress. Also, whenever I have a student with an attitude problem that is hindering their progress, 9 times out of 10, their parent expresses the same attitude when I talk with them about their child. I blame this attitude on the way our state policy makers treat and talk about teachers in our state. Teachers are not the problem here. We are a profession of hard working, dedicated, caring people that want to help children succeed. <br /> <br /> Our schools offer honors programs, gifted programs, and AP courses. There are opportunities for a really good education in North Carolina public schools, yet so many students don't want to challenge themselves enough to get that great education. The AP classes at my school never fill up and some classes don't even get enough students to sign up for them to make the classes. You want students to really begin excelling in North Carolina? Then NC policy makers need to get behind and support teachers in their efforts to help kids challenge themselves. <br /> <br /> Lastly, we need to get some retired teachers to run for office. We need true educators at the state level helping to make educational policy. Retired educators wouldn't just be focused on educational issues, either. Teachers are educated people who are able to consider both sides of any issue; empathize with people from all walks of life; have the ability to learn new things on a daily basis; and are able to communicate extremely well. We may not be allowed to form a union, but with the percentage of teachers there are in each county, what if teachers could get at least one retired teacher elected in each county to the state senate or as a state representative? That is when we might be able to begin seeing some positive policy changes in our state. We have two years to get this together, think about it. <br /> <br /> PS<br /> For all of you teachers that say your problem is the lack of support from administrators, either change schools or work with NCAE to complain. You do not have to take that. I have been where you are before. Usually, when I have had problems with administrators, others have as well, and the administrator eventually left. However, I have also been the one to seek a different school and that is how I ended up, happy, where I am now. Also, build a strong, non-judgemental support group among some of your fellow teachers. Make sure you have each other's back and look out for each other. It will make it much easier to wait out bad administrators.
  69. Janine's avatar
    Janine
    | Permalink
    I apologize about the length of my earlier post. I didn't realize it would post as just one paragraph. Thank you to anyone who took the time to read through that.
  70. Mike's avatar
    Mike
    | Permalink
    I participated in a mentor program much like Janine proposed when I began teaching here in Chicago. I was in a classroom with a veteran teacher for a year before I got placed in a turn around school in Chicago's South Side. If you are going to take low performing schools on on high poverty neighborhoods you need money and you need good leadership. Students that are disruptive in the school need to be disciplined. There has to be a system in place where rude students are not allowed to highjack a classroom. We did that at my school and we have had great success. We have great teachers and supportive administration. I am moving to NC next summer and am terrified of the conditions. I used to think that if I survived CPS that I will be good but CMS has me worried due to the lack of support.
  71. NC Teacher's avatar
    NC Teacher
    | Permalink
    To me the answer is as simple as, teachers banning together, stop complaining about how things are. If teachers as a majority didn't go to work, (Strike, uh-oh I said it, in a right to work state) the state would have no choice but to actually listen. Do you really think they could fire all teachers that took a few sick days on the same days? Change will not happen through complaining. Change will happen through action. When will teachers realize the power we have in our numbers. And don't tell me, well you would be hurting the kids. Because in the long run the benefits to the students would be enormous. Some would say we have NCAE, but what real teeth does NCAE have with school systems administration or state legislature? They speak on your behalf but in the end, the powers that be do as they please. I say it is time that teachers of NC come together. There is strength in numbers, history has shown us that. So, stop complaining and start coming together and make the change(s), we in education know is needed for NC public education.
  72. DT's avatar
    DT
    | Permalink
    "ME" I must address your remarks about teachers not being able to make it in a REAL job and only working part time anyway. I am a CMS retiree. I have both a degree in education and a degree in nursing. Before teaching in CMS, I worked full time as a staff nurse in a major hospital. <br /> As a nurse, at the end of my shift I was able to leave work and not be concerned until my next shift. As a teacher, I took work home with me every day. I attended work shops and seminars, graded papers, made lesson plans and worried about my students. I took students to competition during the summer with no pay.<br /> I challenge you to teach for one week in the school of your choice. Then tell us about a REAL job in the REAL world!
  73. Kathy Shanely's avatar
    Kathy Shanely
    | Permalink
    Problem now is they are requiring teachers from out of state WITH teaching licenses from very good schools to take test $300 a pop (3 test) in order to get a NC license. So even if the teachers want to come down to teach, may not be able to because the testing is a joke - ask teacher high school questions for K-3 jobs as well as charge outrageous price to take test. So if there is a need for teachers now, just wait, will only get worse. And who suffers - THE KIDS!!!! Teachers are saying, forget this, I do not need to pay more out of my pocket to be certified when I already have my certificate. Teachers pay enough out of pocket for their classroom. All the testing DOES NOT make for a good teacher. Actually it is probably the bad teachers that can pass the test. NC is losing a lot of passionate teachers due to their outrageous requirements.
  74. Kathy Shanely's avatar
    Kathy Shanely
    | Permalink
    Responding to DT - YES, teachers sure could make it in the "real" world. I have never seen teachers work so hard to get a classroom ready for that first day of school. That is not counted in their hours. You say they get 2 months off during the summer - well they are not relaxing. Teachers are getting ready for the following year, taking test to keep their licensing or working two jobs during that summer break to be able to afford to teach during that school year. The amount of time and money teachers are required to spend is something that no one sees. Especially those that say teachers do not have a "real" job. That is what is wrong with our Country. Education is the MOST IMPORTANT job because without educated children, our Country will fail. I guess it is just ignorance or hopefully lack of knowledge that has people saying statements that are so ridiculous.
  75. Kerri Calderon's avatar
    Kerri Calderon
    | Permalink
    I have recently heard of the teacher shortage and I was shocked that it was 300 this close to the start of the 2015-2016 school year. I just moved here from California (I taught for 18 years in CA). I come from the second largest district in. CA- NEVER have I heard of such a teacher shortage! My district had been on a hiring freeze for the past 4 years so it was really hard for new teAchers to find employment. I, myself, was heavily recruited from out of state when CA passed class size reduction and needed many teachers quickly. <br /> <br /> My husband looked at me and just said "those poor kids." Clearly working conditions and pay are at play here. Teaching is a stressful job. If you don't take care of your teachers...they will find greener pastures and it seems as though they have. I, personally, took one look at teacher pay in NC and knew the stress wasn't worth the lack of pay. My pay would be half what I made before. It is just insulting. I am glad I have options....it is too bad our students don't. I have met several other newbies to Charlotte who were former teachers in other states...all cite the pay as reason to not apply.<br /> <br /> Which schools and populations will these shortages impact most? I have a guess but would love for a newspaper or station to highlight this. I am guessing our already disadvantaged youth will be further disadvantaged by not having a qualified teacher day one and I bet it's not the first year it has happened. Don't tell me institutional racism doesn't exist- which kids won't have a teacher day 1?
  76. Michael Johnson's avatar
    Michael Johnson
    | Permalink
    Like most other entities, the N.C. education system needs to differentiate between "shortage" and "shortage of what they want," which are two different things. I became qualified by the state as a lateral entry teacher (via RALC) to teach business, have two master's degrees and more than 20 years of professional experience. I applied for six positions with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools system as a marketing/business instructor and received only one phone call for a position that still isn't filled one month after the interview. In fact, I applied for positions in multiple counties in the past five months and never was considered for an interview.<br /> <br /> My wife is a teacher and says that business/marketing teachers with professional experience are hard to find, yet she cannot explain why is it I could not even get an interview. It sounds like the education system is like most employers: They bemoan the lack of "qualified people," when in reality they have unrealistic expectations and even raise standards when someone actually meets the initial standards.
  77. Barbara Ridings's avatar
    Barbara Ridings
    | Permalink
    1) Education is not a soccer game where scores win a game. Education is an entity which scaffolds and builds relationships: Cognitive, Physical, and Social. <br /> <br /> 2) Legislators to this day think that teachers are little wifeys who choose not to stay at home. Even if a female teacher is fortunate enough to have a life mate, the chances are he is not getting paid a decent wage to support a family. Legislators need to get the blinders off. North Carolina loses tax revenue when couples do not make decent wages.<br /> <br /> 3) As professional educators, we are not in place to help some enterpreneur make a lot of money on their new and possibly not-too-brilliant "program" for curriculum. Unfortunately too often, some frightened and pathetic administrator buys into one of these "programs" and it becomes the teachers' job to make it seem like a good thing. The worst part of this is that the children are guinea pigs and it becomes glaringly clear that for whatever "higher thinking order" strategies they may now be thinking - they are handicapped and unable to articulate what they actually know with an adequate ability to apply accepted skills of communication such as vocabulary, grammar, spelling, and handwriting. <br /> <br /> 4) Simply expressed: 'America can not support its educational aspirations culturally.' Until media and culture cleans up its act, education excellence probably will not happen.
  78. Cbryant's avatar
    Cbryant
    | Permalink
    Honestly we can't complain about the pay. We knew that the pay was lousy when we went into the profession. I am resigning due to the administration. I have so many examples of my horrible experiences that they are all flooding my head at once and I don't even know where to begin. Let's start with the fact that I was displaced a month into the school year because of attendance. This should have been found and taken care of within the first week of school. But someone didn't do their job and waited until I had bonded with my wonderful class to realize they were overstaffed and thus rip me from my classroom and move me to a new school. When I arrived at this new school they took all the children who were struggling readers and piled them in my classroom. As a third grade teacher, my highest student read on a first grade level. I even had 2 children who did not even know their letter sounds even though they had been in the states for years and were fluent English speakers. This school didn't even supply me with books on these children's levels. I had to print them offline on the copy paper that I had to buy myself because this school did not purchase paper for teachers. I did my best with what I had and saw lots of growth with these children. I even had a few children grow more than 2 years worth within the 7 months that I had them. However that was not good enough because none of them passed the EOG. Are we really surprised? They couldn't even read when they started the year. Did I receive any support for my struggling readers? Absolutely not! Our reading facilitator spent 1 thirty minute session in my class and my principal NOT 1 TIME stepped foot in my classroom! Then how many of these struggling readers were kept in 3rd grade so they could continue the reading growth that I started and have a better chance at success? Only 1. The 14 others were sent on to struggle through the 4th grade in hopes that this teacher would be a magician who can build the 4th floor on the wobbly and unfinished first 3 floors. When I called my district administrator to express my concern he completely brushed me off and said it sounded like I had a personal issue. He's right I do personally have an issue with shuffling students through the system when they're not ready. I do have an issue with support staff making personal calls and going out to lunch more than they support our classrooms. I do have an issue with a principal who has never stepped into my classroom submitting an evaluation on my teaching based on my students performance on one test. I have an issue with district administrators who believe the peppy talk of principals instead of listening to teachers and what's really going on at the school. CMS needs to seriously change their procedures and policies or they will continue to lose great teachers and continue to have horrible test scores. CMS is failing and I am not just talking about the score we recieve on our district report card.
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